Mixed Media Experimentalist

Profile

 

After teaching Art for nearly twenty years having had a background in Art History and Art Education,  I returned to Art School in Brighton and this cemented the journey towards becoming an Artist in my own right.

I'm passionate about interior and exterior styling and always looking to enhance any space with beautiful works of art, including living art pieces for outside.

The ideas for my paintings emerge from an interest in many subjects but I'm always drawn towards the figurative. I've been a yoga teacher for ten years and this has defintitely had an impact on recent work where anatomy of the human body is a central theme.

My work challenges the traditional approach to painting by combining several processes that almost always include Print. This experimental approach is the key to originality where the process is just as intriguing as the subject itself. 

Rib Cage

Print is an integral part of my work. It lays the foundation for the composition and in my later work it is built upon with a variety of media and often other printmaking techniques.

Pelvis Detail

Bones are a brilliant subject for printing. Interest in this subject-matter started many years ago when I was teaching Print workshops at the Booth Museum of Natural History in Brighton.

Vertabrae and Pelvis

From a yoga perspective, the pelvis and the spine are central to the practice. Neutral pelvis creates a neutral spine, and working towards this balance in the body is often the focus in the journey. 


 

The process of painting is complex. For me it's an instinctive process, yet so challenging intellectually, it can keep you awake at night.

The most crucial part of any work is when you get to the point where it could be finished but you take a massive risk with it. It's a gamble.

Rubbing the whole thing out. Turning the painting up-side-down and rethinking it. Putting it away for months because you can't bear to look at it, then letting it resurface for another phase. 

 I love that point. It could go either way but more often than not, even if it's a mistake, something better happens. The journey of a painting can take years, each layer from a different era, a different thought process. Layers are built up and worn away, integrated and blurred until finally you reach the final touch.